Cloud CAD and Offline Internet

Cloud CAD and Offline Internet

online-offline-cad

I had a chance to attend Google I/O extended 2015 event in Cambridge, Mass yesterday. If you follow up Google I/O, you might be already up to the speed with all Google announcements around Android, Wear, Internet of Things, Photo, etc. If not, check Google I/O 2015. What caught my special attention is Google’s focus on offline. Offline is starting to be important, since Google is thinking about future internet expansion. Think about questions like – how to search on mobile when Internet connection is weak?  or How to navigate using Google Maps with no internet connection?

Offline is an interesting topic. We want to have our life connected and collaborative. But at the same time, we are trying to think how cloud applications will work with absence of internet connection or in the situation when internet connection is very weak. TechCrunch article Google Quest to bring the internet to 7 billion people can give you some brief about what Google plan to do. The following Gizmodo article specifically talks about YouTube offline and Maps offline.

offline-google-maps

Another thing that Google did is optimized download time for bad network connections. I’ve seen a demo and it really makes a difference.

optimized-download

It made me think again about offline topic in the connection of cloud CAD. The “offline” topic is one of those things Autodesk Fusion360 and Onshape are different these days. Read my earlier post – Autodesk and Onshape disagree about cloud technology and focus. For the moment Fusion360 is an app that requires installation and it works connected with Autodesk 360 cloud platform. It can remind you Evernote – you can install it and it will sync data instantly and keep your records so you can access it from any device. Onshape is taking a different route – full cloud CAD application and it works completely in the browser. You can think about it as Google Apps and Gmail-like approach.

Al Dean of Develop3D shared his opinion on strategy and technology of both Onshape and Fusion360 in his article The cloud – a bright future ahead. Here is the passage addressing the “offline” topic.

Eventually, Fusion will be available via the browser (I’d put a fiver on that being before the end of the year). DS’ next generation SolidWorks products will get better and more accessible. Though strangely, this is the unknown in the calculations as DS is reluctant to talk about the whole thing, presumably to protect its dominance with SolidWorks.

And hopefully, OnShape will have a way of working when you’re offline, as well as internet connected. Finally, I’d hope that DS is much more open about getting its customer’s access to the tools it is developing . The excuse that “They’re using our resources so they should pay” simply won’t cut it as these tools need to be played with, discovered and explored. At the moment, they’re not getting the exposure that they deserve — leaving a whole new market open to Autodesk and Onshape.

What is my conclusion? Will CAD vendors take Google way to make cloud CAD offline? This is an interesting place to watch. Google made several attempts for offline work in Google Apps. It didn’t work in the past, but these days I can save my work offline in Google Drive and it is magically getting in sync when my computer connects back to the internet. Google Maps is a great example how to address specific offline needs. I guess cloud CAD vendors can learn a lesson from Google. It seems to me Autodesk and Onshape will be coming to offline mode from two separate directions. However, focus on customers can be a good guidance to see what is important and when. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg

Google I/O pictures credit Gizmodo

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

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  • Hi Oleg, I would argue this is an issue with Cloud solutions in general and not just cloud CAD. First gen solutions have been based on a philosophy of “cloud only” assuming that connectivity if not already ubiquitous, must be in the near future. The folly of that assumption ignores that most of the world is nowhere close to that level of connectivity, and does not acknowledge that both bandwidth and latency is a finite resource, and subject to variable cost. If we’re to treat connectivity as a utility like electricity or water, it’s natural to assume it would be billed by its use, which as a result would encourage conservation. That’s where solutions have to move to a “Cloud first” approach that are resilient when connectivity fluctuates, is not available, or is too costly. Unfortunately the introduces another layer of complexity and a plethora of difficult synchronization edge cases, but is ultimately a necessary step from assuming connectivity is infinite. http://eng-eng.com/the-offline-hole/

  • beyondplm

    Ed, thanks for your comment and link! I forgot about your post about “offline”, but it makes a total sense. Yes, this problem is not specifically for cloud CAD. My main point that for some solutions (and cloud CAD is one of them), it can be a critical element to drive acceptance by large amount of users.