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Companies

data-silos

I want to continue the discussion about data ownership and synchronization between islands of information in a company. EBOM and MBOM synchronization I mentioned in my previous post is probably the most typical one. But there are many others. Supply chain, contract manufacturing, regulation, customer support and services – this is only very short list where data stays under control of different systems. Even the idea of pulling data under a control of single system was an option a decade ago, my hunch that these days, the idea of PLM one big silo is getting less popular.

Control Engineering Asia published an article Hitachi Sunway Talks PLM Opportunities and Developments. Thammaya Chuay-iam of Hitachi Sunway Information Systems in Tailand, shared his thoughts about some of the major trends happening in the PLM sector in Asia, the opportunities and challenges. One of the topics caught my attention. It was specifically related to the issue of integration. Here is my favorite passage:

[Q] What are the biggest challenges being faced by manufacturers when it comes to their PLM activities? [A] Even though PLM initiatives within global companies have developed significantly over the years, the core challenge of the manufacturing industry remains the ever-growing need for consistent integration between PLM solutions and other enterprise systems. Another challenge is the need for focused solutions that address the needs of targeted groups within the PLM environment.

It made me think again about integration topic. The problem is here for the last 20-25 years. In many situations, the solutions companies are using remain unchanged for decades. It is brutal export/import/sync of data. It brings complexity and it cost money.

What is my conclusion? I guess the fundamental idea of “data pumping” between different systems should be replaced by something better. I’ve been touching it in my post about data ownership and data sharing. Web technologies can give us a better way to share, link and intertwine data. I believe it can be a better way and it will replace brutal data synchronization. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg

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plm-info-context

I had a chance to read “Google ‘A Million Miles Away from Creating the Search Engine of my Dreams’, Says Larry Page.” this morning. The article points to Mr. Page annual “Founder’s Letter”, published ahead of the company’s annual shareholder meeting.

One of the most interesting part to me was how Mr. Page sees Google focus on answering a user’s question. Here is my favorite passage:

“Information is Google’s core,” Page said, noting that over 100 billion Google searches are conducted each month — 15 percent of which are never-before-asked new queries. The search engine is working on being able to provide direct answers to questions rather than just a list of results said Page, adding that Voice Search now works in 38 languages.

It made me think about engineers, product development, search and information retrieval. Tine glitch I learned 5 years ago when I started to work with engineers on how search can solve their information problems. Usually, engineers don’t know what question to ask. What was the most important to engineers is the ability to provide an additional information about the answer,which helps to get the right result. Project, supplier, date/time, customer name… this is a short list of examples.

This Later in the latter Mr. Page outlined the importance of “context”. Here is another passage:

Page explained: “Improved context will also help make search more natural, and not a series of keywords you artificially type into a computer. We’re getting closer: ask how tall the Eiffel Tower is, and then when ‘it’ was built. By understanding what ‘it’ means in different contexts, we can make search conversational.”

In many cases “context” is an important lifecycle piece of data need to retrieve the right information. Revision, Configuration, Manufacturer, Serial Number, Project Name – these are all examples of contextual information needed to make data retrieval easy and painlessly. Search for part description can bring you thousands of results. You won’t be able to filter the right one. Context might have a larger implication in the future world. You may find more examples about “contextual world” in the book - The Age of Context by Robert Scoble and Shel Israel.

What is my conclusion? Keyword search as a foundation of information retrieval mechanism is dying. Information overload. Laundry list of results. Not good. We are moving to the age of contextual information retrieval. To get right context from the data and user is the key element of successful information retrieval. Product development and manufacturing is a very complicated environment. Data is intertwined and disconnected. It is essential to build right contexts to get right answer. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg

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henry-ford-assembly-line

If you are in PLM business, I’m sure you are familiar with term called “best practices”. The term is widely used to explain how PLM system can be deployed, how to manage data and how to organize and optimize product development processes. So, where are roots of PLM best practices and why PLM vendors like them so much? Remember, the original PLM (and even PDM) systems started as a glorified data management toolkit with elements of CAD and ERP integrations. To get such system in product was very expensive and it required lot of time and implementation services. The reason is simple – every manufacturing company is different. It takes time for service provider to understand company landscape, processes, data requirements, legacy systems and suggest a solution. Put heavy price tag next to this activity. You can think about this process as something similar to organizing mass production assembly line. It is costly and complicated. Once you’ve get it done, your objective will be simple – run it to the largest possible quantity without re-configuration (which will cost you money, again). The same happened with first large PLM implementations.

The invention of “best practices” helped to figure out how to move from heavy and complicated PLM assembly line to more configurable and flexible mechanisms of PLM deployment. Technologically, toolkit approach was a underline product foundation. PLM companies and especially service providers and PLM consultants liked the approach. To create OOTB (out-of-the-box) pre-configured environments was relatively easy based on the practices gathered from existing large customers. However, to get it to the field and implement wasn’t so simple. Marketing and sales used OOTB environments to demonstrate and make sales. However, implementations and fine tuning was failing to apply it after that. The implementation devil was in details and service teams were required to bring to production. Similar to manufacturing mass production environment, customizing and services was a straightforward answer to solve the problem of product and requirement diversity.

As we know from the history of manufacturing, mass customization won and left mass production system in a dust. What was clear innovation 100 years ago was replaced by new forms of manufacturing, customization and flexible manufacturing units. I believe this is still very hot topic in the industry and every manufacturing company. The diversity of product requirements is skyrocketing, product lifecycle is getting even shorter. To produce PLM system that will fit this type of environment is probably one of the most important innovation that might happen in engineering and manufacturing software technologies these days.

What is my conclusion? I think software companies can learn something from the history of manufacturing companies. The move from from mass product to mass customization is one of them. PLM software made a turn from from complicated preconfigured assembly lines to expensive data management toolkits that require services. Manufacturing is getting different these days. Next step can be hardly achieved by pure technology or process organization. My hunch it is going to be a hybrid of new data management technologies empowered by crowdsourcing and customer innovation. Just my thoughts…

Best, Oleg

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JIT’s impact on PLM and BOM management

February 21, 2014

JIT (Just in Time) is a well-known approach in manufacturing industry. In a nutshell, JIT is a production strategy to reduce inventory and associated cost. The philosophy of JIT is related to processing and transactions of inventories, which adds additional cost. By removal (or reducing) of inventories, you can reduce a total cost of production. You […]

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How PLM can solve problem of global BOM transparency

February 20, 2014

Business is going global. It is not only for large manufacturing companies these days. As a result of cost pressure and searches for new market opportunities, manufacturing companies are looking how to optimize their businesses. Distributed engineering, manufacturing and suppliers environments – reality of manufacturing these days. However, outsourcing and future development of supply chain […]

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CAD, Engineers and Online Communities

February 19, 2014

Remember our life before internet? The meaning of community was about social group that shares common values. Actually, the history of communities is longer than history of CAD software . So called “Community Rules” were mentioned in one of the first scrolls found in Qumran Cave. Community word often explains common geography or environment. However, […]

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PLM, Engineering processes and flat organizational structure

February 13, 2014

Our information life is getting more complicated these days. The time when our digital channel was limited to our desktop computer gone forever. Streams of information are coming to us from every place – desktop computer (as much as we are coming to the desk), laptops, mobile devices and fast approaching us wearable devices. Info […]

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The Ugly Truth of Multi-BOM Management

December 17, 2013

Bill of Material (BOM) management is always fascinating topic. It sparks so many debates and introduce a large set of diverse opinions. I can even say that I have a special passion to speak about BOM on my blog. If you want to catch up on my recent posts about BOM, you can try these […]

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Full Product Lifecycle, Cloud and Granular Security

November 27, 2013

Security is one of the most fundamental things in enterprise systems. If you think about every enterprise system as a big data store with applied business rules, security will be the one you will need to evaluate first in order to map it to your organization. It comes in multiple dimensions about who is getting […]

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Will Tesla Motors build their own PLM system?

November 4, 2013

History of CAD and PLM development knows examples of home grown systems. 20-25 years ago, the idea to build their own CAD and PDM system was considered as an absolutely normal option. Since that time, many things changed. In my view, the last decade clearly demonstrated PDM/PLM trend towards using more OOTB (out-of-the-box) and ready […]

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